CHRONICLES OF NYSC CAMP - DAY 2

16 – 10 – 2007

We were woken up by 4 a.m. and told to file out. Did I tell you I made a new friend? Actually I made many, but I stuck with a fellow Lagos Corper – Lola. She is also a Unilag graduate. I introduced her to Benny and Kanny, and eventually Tommy. After the morning prayer, we were taken on a drill. Its been long since I matched for AYM (Adventist Youth Ministry) and that was even voluntary. This is stress! We spent about four hours matching up and down, and learning how to come to attention – by number. I hate that procedure: the Drill Instructor shouts, “Attention by number!” and you raise your left leg, shouting, “One!”. When he shouts “Two!”, you reply “Two” and hit your foot hard on the ground. Aaaaarrrrggghhh!

After the drill, it was time for breakfast and I was on the queue faithfully, only to discover that we were being served “Rock Buns” (that is what I could call the Akara (bean cakes) that we were given), and water – akamu (it was actually yellow lumpy pap). I took the rock buns, got to my room and soaked Ijebu Garri. When the buns finished, I topped it with roasted fish. I was filled. Nothing beats Ijebu Garri. We were given about two hours for breakfast, before we were summoned back to the field for more drills. It turns out the Osun State Governor was coming to “swear us in” as Corpers tomorrow, and the soldiers wanted the drill to ‘look’ as perfect as possible.

Its so tough - I should have expected it all but somehow I didn’t. I called Vicky and yabbed him for not warning me ahead. The sun is too hot, the morning was so cold. And the drills are too long, like we were being prepared for the Army.

Lola’s not feeling well at all. We finally have water running in the hall. More students showed up today, more Unilag faces especially. We left the parade grounds around 7 p.m. – in darkness. My roommates are ok, my corner especially. I’m pallied up with everybody in my half of the room (trust me, Miss Friendly & Nice) – there are 19 bunks in each room, meaning we are about 38 in each room. I got another close friend – Hippy (she’s got big hips, though she’s sort of slim), who finished from LASU(Lagos State University), and read Banking & Finance. We collected our dinner in the rain – rice, watery stew and hard ponmo. Lola left the parade grounds for the clinic, then went to the room to bath and sleep. We met her in the room, refreshed but still weak. She went to Mammi market (that’s what they call the general market in the camp, where you can get everything and almost anything).

By the time Hippy and I got our food, bought pure water (now that is what we call water in satchets, because the manufacturers always claim purity.) and returned to the hall, we began to get worried about Lola as she had not returned. We grabbed a torchlight (no electricity at that point in time) and went on a search. We found her on her way back, gisting with a “comrade Geoffrey” who had taken it upon himself to ensure that she got to her hall safely (after paying for her meal). My home girl was sharp – she’d ordered eba and ewedu soup, plus Malta Guiness (a malt drink) = expensive meal.

I was so tired that I was woken up twice in the night to undress. I finally got up around 1 a.m. to do that. Did I mention that Titi called me? Her voice was so sad that I didn’t know what to say. I sent her a text message because I just couldn’t call – its too painful.

Comments

xi said…
...we were being served “Rock Buns” (that is what I could call the Akara (bean cakes) that we were given), and water – akamu (it was actually yellow lumpy pap). I took the rock buns, got to my room and soaked Ijebu Garri. When the buns finished, I topped it with roasted fish. I was filled. Nothing beats Ijebu Garri....

My conclusion: your boyfriend must have a fortune in savings by now o, you're so low-maintenance. Na your kine person go dey complain if you go yankee...:-)
Daydah said…
@xi: Just because I enjoy ijebu garri (even less than my darling does, if you must know), doesnt mean that I am low maintenance. It simply shows that I prefer keeping it real, putting the necessary things in perspective and not being excessively materialistic as most girls are today.
I am simply being me....
xi said…
Yeah, I understand.

I've got a friend who doesnt drink. For economic reasons. :-)